11/14/10

Braided Winter Headband

Never have I received more comments and compliments on a knitted piece of mine. It was selected as a featured knitting project for October on craftster.org

I adore this headband, but I only wish I could knit seed stitch faster. I wrap my yarn instead of grabbing? I'm not sure. I knit the other method than most people so I'm slower with switching from knit to purl.

This headband is a simple construction. I did not come up with the pattern. I spied on someone in Seward who was wearing it and figured out how to make it.

** UPDATE ** I wrote this pattern a long time ago when I was less experienced in pattern making. I have received many requests about clarifications. If you find yourself stumped and would like to ask me something, please contact me here. I have a new blog and no longer get notified of comments on this site (for some reason). -- Natasha





Ingredients:
Size 7 straight needles and double points
darning needle
worsted weight yarn
three buttons
needle and thread


Directions:Cast on 24 st. 
Knit garter stitch for three rows
Knit in seed stitch for 10 inches. I slip the first stitch of each row to make an even edge.
At ten inches, *transfer 8 stitches to a double point needle and continue seed stitch pattern for another 11 inches. 
To make a tapered edge, knit the first two stitches together, continue the seed stitch, then knit two last stitches together (6 st). 
Seed stitch the next row.
K2Tog, seed st, knit last two stitches together (4 st).
Knit the next row
CO and leave a 12" tail.*
Repeat ** for the remaining stitches. It should look something like this:




When you have all three strips finished, braid them, pinning the overlapping parts in place how you like them. With the yarn tails and darning needle, sew the pointed ends to the beginning of the work, creating the headband.
With needle and thread, sew the pinned overlapping parts, making sure the thread doesn't show through the front of the piece.
Sew on buttons.

15 comments:

  1. I have a headband just like your braided one, but in green and blue. Every time I wear it people comment on how pretty it is!

    Thanks,Natasha!

    XOXOXO,
    Mom

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  2. I dunno if this is a silly question, but after you transfer your first stitches onto a doulbe point needle and finish that, isn't your yarn at the end of that first prong? How do you then do the other two prongs?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm wondering the same thing.

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  3. Would love to knit this headband, but I have never heard of seed stitch!! Sorry. Could someone please tell me how to knit seed stitch. Thank you so much. xx Barbara

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. K1 P1 across row 1 -- K1 P1 across row 2 using an unever number of stitches, thus you K the purl and P the knits, it gives you a bumpy (seed) finish

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  4. I forgot to add my email address when I published the query of how to knit seed stitch. Sorry again!!! Barbara vlabec@ntlworld.com xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Seed Stitch: k,p,k,p,k,p turn p,k,p,k,p,k and so on..

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  5. Would you mind if I did this in crochet and submitted it for publication? When my children were little and I was a stay-at-home Mom I designed a lot of crochet and had it published. I stoped about 15 years ago. Now I am retired on social security and at it again. Sold a doily design. Do let me know. I LOVE this!!! (I can knit, but only if you hold a gun to my head.

    jesusislord1953@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You have my permission to make a crochet version. I was actually thinking of making a crochet pattern, but I haven't gotten to it. I do hope you'll send me the pattern once you write it up!
      Thanks for asking me,
      Natasha

      Delete
    2. I have the same question as the 2 Feb. anonymous people. How do you get the stitches for the next two strips. I 'm stumped. Thanks.

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    3. Sorry for the delayed reply. I have a new blog and I'm not being notified of comments here for some reason. I'm not sure how to better explain this step of the pattern. You have all your stitches on one needle. You then transfer the first 8 stitches to a double pointed needle of the same size and knit back and forth till it's the proper length. You cut the yarn then return to the remaining 16 stitches. You'll transfer 8 of those stitches to a double pointed needle, bring in a new piece of yarn and knit back and forth in seed stitch till it's the same length as the first. You cut the yarn and you're now left with 8 "live" stitches on the remaining needle. Bring in new yarn and knit in seed stitch till it's the same length.

      I hope that helps and I apologize again for my late reply.
      -Natasha

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  6. Are the needles 7mm and knit on 2 needles

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry for the delayed reply. This pattern is knit on US size 7 needles. I use a set of double pointed needles because it's easier for me to work the small sets of 8 stitches on shorter needles.

      Thanks for your comment,
      Natasha

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  7. Have you heard of a Norwegian purl? You can execute a purl stitch from the back of the work, so your yarn stays in place for the next knit stitch. It's perfect for seed stitch, but I've also used it for ribbing and double-knitting. Hope that helps!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello and sorry for the delayed reply. I have a new blog and I wasn't notified of your comment. I have indeed heard of a Norwegian purl. I really like it and prefer it to normal purling, but I don't think I'm much faster with it. Thanks for the suggestion though!
      -Natasha

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